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Professional News

Call for Papers – 17th Annual SALISES Conference

SALISES 17TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE

March 30 to April 01, 2016

“Revolution, Socio-economic Change and Freedoms”
Commemorating 50 Years of Independence in Barbados and the Bicentennial of the 1816 Rebellion (Bussa Revolt, Barbados)

Rationale and Objectives

In April 2016, Barbados officials and Civil Society organisations will mark the 200th anniversary of the 1816 Bussa Rebellion, one of the three defining 19th century rebellions (the Demerara Rebellion of 1823 and the 1831 Christmas Rebellion in Jamaica) that in part led to the denouement of Anglophone Caribbean plantation slavery.  This event  coincides with yet another Caribbean milestone celebration of 50 years of Independence, this time in Barbados.  These twin events afford another opportunity for SALISES and the UWI to recapitulate its familiar conference concerns to do with human and environmental development, life satisfaction and happiness in the Caribbean.  Here, we encourage a critical interrogation of self, society, ecology and economy alongside the global.  In essence, we ask contributors across the human and related policy sciences to assimilate into their readings of economic globalization, sustainable development, and social uplift, the gaps and hiatuses in the grand pursuit of emancipation and freedom.

The aim is to showcase ideas, reforms and policy measures that mark the dawn of the post-neoliberal hour: climate and environmental justice, reparatory justice, a socially just economy, democratic inclusion, decent work, gender equity and human dignity.  The themes listed below signal the scope of address and recalls our commitment to project a visioning of the next 50 years.  The hope is that the exchange will enhance the goal of Caribbean renewal.  By asking: what were/are the design principles that brought us here; what of our cultural ideals, our class interests, our assimilated learning, our conceptions of progress, our views of the stable society and economy; how are/were these contested; and what kinds of political engagements are required to effect social change – that we engender a dislodging of some prevailing discourses and practices.

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